Good web writer

Posted: August 13, 2010 in Uncategorized, Web writing
Tags: , ,

I found this week’s reading relevant to what we are doing as an editor or a writer for digital media.

Nielsen reading interests me as he points out a number of key devices in writing for a web page. It is true that not many people nowadays can read websites word-by-word for some reasons. I used to read through a web page but then I found it impossible, especially when I did the research for my assignments. Also, what makes me impressed the article lies in its emphasis on the element of ‘credibility’ of the web content.

Kissane reading usefully explains the importance of the web’s incredibility in nowadays communication context. I agree with the writer’s argument on the fact that not many web pages provide information precisely and effectively due to the lack of ‘conveyable meaning’. Kissance makes the argument more convincing by providing actual evidence on Academia Solutions and presenting four strategic questions in writing for a product web page. The four elements are all important but for me the question of why the product is better than the others is the most significant one. This is because this query can show the quality of the web page and the writer’ strive to do deep research. I found the slide on web content is relevant to Kissance’s idea as it highlights the duty of web publishers in developing a content strategy.

Compared to the two other articles, Lynch and Horton’s reading is more practical. The writers usefully provide different elements of web writing by explaining why it is important and how to apply it. The most interesting part of the article is the discussion of the three major elements of rhetorical persuasion that is related to web design, including ‘ethos’, ‘pathos’, and ‘logos’. Understanding the meaning of these three elements can help us evaluate a web site.

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